The First Pendleton Round-Up

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The idea for the Pendleton Round-Up originated in 1910 when a group of men from Umatilla County were gathered in Portland for the Rose Festival.

It was proposed that Pendleton should hold a community event and that a western show was the answer. The men formed a company, sold stock, and that September the first Round-Up was held.

It was so popular the City of Pendleton purchased the company stock and made the Round-Up a civic event complete with cowboy and cowgirl competitions and entertainment depicting what life was like in the days of the Wild West.

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Each September since, the call goes out, “Let ’er Buck,” and the Pendleton Round-Up kicks off.

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Red White Black: A True Story of Race and Rodeo The 2013 Pendleton Round-Up takes place September 11th – 14th. Rick Steber will be in various locations in Pendleton, Oregon, September 10th – 14th, signing copies of his new book: Red White Black: A True Story of Race and Rodeo. View his book signing schedule here: http://ricksteber.com/book-sign-schedule.html 

Red Black White tells the true story of the 1911 Pendleton Round-Up. Three men of different skin colors – Jackson Sundown, John Spain, and George Fletcher – are brought together during the finals of the Northwest Saddle Bronc Championship. What happened that September day, the judges’ decision and the reaction of the crowd in the aftermath, forever changed the sport of rodeo, and the way the emerging West was to look at itself.about the 1911 Pendleton Roundup and how it forever changed the sport of rodeo, and the way the emerging West was to look at itself.

You can purchase of Red Black White online at: http://ricksteber.com/newreleases.html

 

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A Moment in Oregon’s History: 1823 – Moses “Black” Harris

Moses "Black" Harris (on the left) in an Alfred Jacob Miller Painting

Moses “Black” Harris (on the left) in an Alfred Jacob Miller Painting

Moses “Black” Harris was a Kentucky-born descendent of slaves who became a respected mountain man. In 1823 he joined William Ashley’s caravan of young trappers and in 1836 served as a guide for the Whitman-Spalding party, and as a guide for the Nathaniel Ford party in 1844.

whitman-spaulding mapHe settled in Oregon and built a cabin on the Luckiamute River in the Willamette Valley. Here he delighted the arriving pioneers with his wild tall tales and story telling abilities. He was in The Dalles in 1845 and formed a rescue party to save a member of the Lost Wagon Train.

He passed away from cholera at Independence, Missouri on May 6, 1849.

Visit my website at Writing the West, http://ricksteber.com for more tales of the Wild West, including non-fiction biographies and novels, audio books and DVDs. My books are now available for purchase as ebooks.

Stay tuned for the publication of my new book: Red White Black, A True Story of Race and Rodeo.